Author Archives: ewadmin

Northwest School of Wooden Boat Building

Students of the Northwest School of Wooden Boat Building in Port Townsend, Washington, recently built the Caledonia Yawl, an Ian Oughtred design. The boat was commissioned by the Four Winds Camp on Orcas Island in Puget Sound and is the second one the school has built for them. Instructor Bruce Batchely believes this is the best built boat to come out of the shop so far. They modified the boat to suit the camp’s need for buoyancy and storage, and made the spars hollow to keep the rig light. Continue reading

Bicycle Frame Repair vs Wall Art

By Randy Zajac

I will start by saying that, in my opinion, most carbon fiber bicycle frames that have sustained damage from an impact should not be repaired—there are too many damaged fibers that are typically unseen. The two repaired frames featured in this article had damage caused by operator error, not impact. The last two frames are prime examples of parts that should not be repaired for safety reasons. Continue reading

The Artistador

Claudia Toutain-Dorbec is a multi-media artist living in northern New Mexico. The Downey Gallery in Santa Fe asked Claudia to create a life-size sculpture in preparation for the city’s 400th birthday celebration which began Labor Day weekend 2009, and runs for a year. She created the Artistador, a conquistador who is also an artist, seeking his treasure in art. He stands with his arm extended pointing at his treasure, with brushes in hand, and a palette at his feet. The sculpture, displayed on the Downey Gallery’s roof, had to be lightweight, but strong enough to withstand high winds and all kinds of severe weather. Continue reading

Looking Back

How WEST SYSTEM® Products Got Their Start

by Meade Gougeon

Epoxyworks 28

Cover Photo: Top image – First GBI crew building HOT FLASH in the early ’70s. Bottom image – The Gougeon Brothers, Inc. team in 2008.

 

2009 was the 40th Anniversary of Gougeon Brothers, Inc. 1969 marked a point in the Gougeon brothers’ careers when they applied all they had learned about wooden structures and epoxy technology to manufacture, for the first time, a product utilizing wood/epoxy composite construction. The full story of Gougeon Brothers, Inc. begins long before that date and is sure to continue well into the next 40 years.

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Attaching Guide Lines to Fly Rods with G/flex

By Tim Veale

Fly fishing, particularly for Atlantic Salmon, has been my lifelong hobby. The fly rod itself has an ancient past but its technical prowess as an instrument to launch line and fly to a designated spot on the river was epitomized by the arrival of handcrafted split bamboo rods in the late nineteenth century. Continue reading

Saving the Deck

Jeff Blackmon

There are often interesting articles in Epoxyworks magazine illustrating the different uses of the WEST SYSTEM epoxy. I admire the time and effort that goes into some of these handmade boats that are like art projects. But in my particular situation, I was most concerned about strength rather than the aesthetics. I was dealing with wood rot at the bases of the support posts for a large patio deck. There are two levels on this deck, with the patio furniture on the top level and a built-in hot tub in the lower level. The deck is constructed of 6×6 support posts, 2×12 flooring supports and 2×4s for the finished floor. All of this is redwood. Continue reading

Building the Arch Davis Sand Dollar

By Nelson Niederer

We’ve had various types of boats in my family since the ’60s, beginning with a painted canvas and flat-bottom wooden canoe my father built which we used for bow fishing. My grandfather bought a 1959 Lonestar fiberglass ski boat with a 35 hp Evinrude outboard for his kids and grand kids, among the first seen on Sand Lake in northern Michigan. Grandpa never Continue reading

Plastic Engine Cover Repair

By Jeff Wright

My wife’s 2000 Audi TT has a very sleek shape, and these smooth lines are carried under the hood with molded plastic engine covers that provide a very clean looking engine. Unfortunately when I was servicing a burned out bulb, I attempted to remove the covers in the wrong sequence which caused a tab to snap off.   Continue reading

Marquetry Made Easy

By Al Witham

There is a simple way for those of us who may be “artistically challenged” to produce inlaid furniture, jewelry boxes, canoe decks, trays, etc. with a modest investment in equipment and materials, in a reasonable period of time, and with eye-pleasing results. I have no formal training in making inlays, but have found a method which works for me. I showed this method to a friend who is a shop teacher; he now has students as young as ten incorporating it into their school projects with excellent results. My method is adaptable, user-friendly within limits and forgiving of minor cutting errors. Even novices can produce great looking marquetry. Continue reading