Tag Archives: Scheherazade

Scheherazade Update

Courtesy of Hodgdon Yachts

Epoxyworks #23, Spring 2006

Cover Photo: Scheherazade, a 155′ Ted Fontaine-designed ketch. Image by Onne van der Wal.

Hodgdon Yachts of East Boothbay, Maine launched of the 155′ ketch, Scheherazade. She is a beautiful union of wood/epoxy technology, elegant design and superior craftsmanship.

You may recall from Epoxyworks 17 and 19 that Scheherazade was to be one of the largest cold molded wood/epoxy vessels ever built in the United States. Her 3½” thick hull is made of inner and outer layers of 7/8″ Douglas fir planking running fore and aft and separated by
four diagonal layers of 7/16″ western red cedar bonded with WEST SYSTEM® epoxy. Continue reading

Testing large fasteners

Testing Large Bonded-In Fasteners

by Brian Knight

Epoxyworks 19

Cover Photo: The 154’7″ Bruce King-designed Scheherazade resting on her massive keel at Hodgdon Yachts in East Boothbay, Maine.

Scheherazade is a 154′ 7″ Bruce King designed ketch under construction at Hodgdon Yachts, in East Boothbay, Maine. Scheherazade is 60% larger than Antonisa, the last Bruce King/Hodgdon Yacht collaboration, and is the largest sailboat under construction in the United States. We first looked at Scheherazade in EPOXYWORKS 17, Spring 2001, before she was rolled and set on her 153,000 lb ballast keel. On a March, 2002 visit, Scheherazade was resting on her massive keel (cover), while far above, surrounded by multiple levels of staging, work continued on her interior and deck (below). Continue reading

SCHEHERAZADE

By Tom Pawlak

On a break from the Maine Boatbuilders Show in March, we visited Hodgdon Yachts, Inc. and found significant progress on their latest build, a 155′ Bruce King designed wood/epoxy ketch, named Scheherazade. This is Hodgdon Yachts’ largest wood/epoxy vessel to date. The project is roughly 60% larger than Antonisa, the 124′ sailing yacht they launched last year.

Scheherazade is being built in Hodgdon’s new 20,000 square foot facility located at the water’s edge in East Boothbay, Maine. A project this size would not have been possible in Continue reading