Tag Archives: Fall 2001

Building Prams

For a Community Sailing Program

by Bruce Niederer

EW-18 cover

Cover Photo: A new fleet of optimist prams were built to serve the Saginaw Bay Community Sailing Association

The Saginaw Bay Community Sailing Association (SBCSA) was founded in 1995 by a group of local sailboat racers who shared a vision of a grass roots organization to provide area youngsters and adults a low cost introduction to sailing. We began that first season with three Transfusion 547’s purchased for the association by Gougeon Brothers, Inc. (GBI) and a half dozen used Optimist prams donated by the Saginaw Bay Yacht Racing Association. Continue reading

Estimating Epoxy Amounts

Estimating Epoxy Amounts

By Bruce Niederer

This formula will help you estimate the amount of mixed epoxy needed to wet out fiberglass cloth (assuming a resin-to-fiber ratio of 50:50) and apply three rolled epoxy coats to fill the weave of the cloth, i.e. “fill coats.”

The formula includes a waste factor of approximately 15%; however, more (or less) may be needed depending on the job and personal application technique. The epoxy is applied at standard room temperature, approximately 72° F. Continue reading

Laminated Canoe

Laminated Construction Gives Lasting Value

John McKibbin recently sent pictures of his refinished 18′ canoe. He built it twenty-five years ago, using cold-molded, that is, laminated composite construction, with WEST SYSTEM® epoxy. Laminating a hull is similar to making your own plywood on a three dimensional mold. While it may take more time and effort to make a laminated hull, the results are well worth it to many. Continue reading

No Visible Means of Support

By Brian Knight

It was only after I said “No problem” to my sister’s request for a shelf installed on the wall of her new house that she dropped the other shoe. She wanted the shelf cantilevered from the wall with nothing visible holding it up. “Simple,” I said out loud, but I was thinking, “how the heck am I going to do this?” I decided to use hardware bonding to install the shelf. Continue reading

Supported in Style

carport

This beautiful carport was designed by Barron & Toups of New Orleans, LA and buildt by John M. Davis

By John M. Davis

These pictures show a recent project in which I put WEST SYSTEM® to good use. The shade slats shown were attached to their notched supports by ‘blind’ nails (8D hot-dipped galvanized finishing, with the heads clipped after being driven into the notches halfway) and 105/209 applied in the two-stage manner. Continue reading

Building a Wood/Epoxy Sharpie – Phase II

Designing & Building the Rudder and Motor Bracket

By J.R. Watson

Building the rudder

The sharpie’s main reason for existence for over a hundred years is its fine operation in shallow water. However, the conventional sharpie rudder is notorious for causing squirrelly steering, often becoming totally ineffective when the craft heels more than 20°. Most sharpie sailors simply accept the handling aggravations of the conventional rudder in trade for its wonderful steering ability in the shallows. I decided to resolve the traditional faults in steering by installing a special rudder and steering system that has evolved and is used on some contemporary boats. This system will yield maximum control over a wide range of wind and sea conditions while retaining the sharpie’s shallow water virtues. Continue reading

Wood/Epoxy Composite Tank Guidelines

By Patrick Ropp

Builders have successfully constructed tanks for potable water, sewage, gray water, ballast and diesel fuel tanks and a limited number of gasoline tanks using WEST SYSTEM® epoxy since the early 1970’s. The regulatory environment has evolved within the last thirty years and has placed safety restrictions on various aspects of tank building, specifically potable water and gasoline. Continue reading

The Scarffer is a tool for cutting plywood

Plywood Basics

By J.R. Watson

Since so many projects in Epoxyworks incorporate plywood, we felt it might be valuable to discuss briefly the types of plywood and some construction methods best suited to it. It’s easy to understand why people like plywood and choose it for so many projects: it is readily available, comes in convenient sheets (typically 4’×8′), is pretty light for its stiffness and strength (1/8″ plywood weighs about 11 lb per 32 sq ft panel), and is a bargain when compared to the price of many composite panels. However, plywood also has its weak points. There are limits regarding shape development because plywood can be compounded (bent in two directions at once) very little. In addition, plywood contains end grain on all its edges, Continue reading