Tag Archives: Fall 1996

Shelf Life in Real Life

While WEST SYSTEM® epoxy has a long shelf life, age will eventually affect its handling characteristics and cured strength. When stored for very long periods, hardeners may turn darker (reddish to purple), become thicker and give off more odor. 105 Resin may lose some clarity and also become slightly thicker. Use extra care when mixing age-thickened products (stir extra thoroughly), and don’t use old epoxy if color or clarity is crucial to your project. Continue reading

The Re-commissioning of Adagio

by Meade A. Gougeon

Epoxyworks 8

Cover Photo: ADAGIO was racing with fast company in the 1996 Port Huron to Mackinac Race.

It was after eight months of building that we originally launched Adagio, our 35-foot cruising trimaran. It was on July 6, 1970, and she was then a unique boat in three respects.

First, she was the first large wooden boat entirely bonded together with epoxy using no permanent fastenings. While this is common today, it was revolutionary stuff back when adhesives for wooden boatbuilding (including epoxies) were looked upon as a backup to traditional wood fasteners like nails, screws and bolts. Continue reading

The Wingmast Advantage

By J.R. Watson

One of the original experimental components of Adagio was the rotating wing mast. In 1970, a plywood mast (a fore runner to our 050 mast design) was stepped on Adagio.

The rotated airfoil-shaped wing mast makes a smooth transition from mast to sail on the leeward side. This provides cleaner airflow around the mast. The benefit is better attached airflow, thus less drag and more power driving the boat. Continue reading

Climbing Drum Peel Test for Adhesives

By Bruce Niederer

No matter how you use WEST SYSTEM epoxies, you expect us to back up the products and methods we recommend with solid data based on tests that simulate “real life” applications. To this end we began conducting the ASTM 1781-93 test method known as the Climbing Drum Peel for Adhesives. As expected, the results from this test method compliment the data we’ve already compiled using the PATTI (Pneumatic Adhesion Tensile Testing Instrument) meter. Continue reading

Repairing a Hobie 16

By Brian Knight

My son was sailing his older model Hobie 16 when the aft trampoline post suddenly gave way. The support structure holding the post in place failed, allowing the deck to deflect downwards and also punching a hole in the hull. Paul used WEST SYSTEM Epoxy and the following techniques to repair the damage. Continue reading

fairing a beach cat's bottom

Fairing a Fiberglass Beach Cat’s Bottom

By Captain James R. Watson

Dragging your catamaran over sandy beaches can abrade away material on the bottom of the hull, thereby flattening the sectional shape. Usually this area will extend 4 or 5 feet each way of the hull’s mid-section. You need to fix it so it doesn’t wear through, and to maintain optimum design performance. Continue reading

Pedal Boat

Bass Straight Crossing in a Pedal Boat

On December 13, 1996, Stuart Andrew became the first person to cross the Bass Straight alone in a pedal boat. On completing this goal he remarked, “I’d never do it again. I’d never think of doing it again. My legs feel like big lumps of wood, my eyes are stinging, but I’ve finally made it.” The following article was published by Epoxyworks in Fall 1996, a few months before Andrews made his record breaking journey in a 7.45 meter pedal boat constructed of Durakore® and WEST SYSTEM® Epoxy.

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mounting a cleat

Repair Tips: Backer Plates & Mounting Cleats

By Jerry Cronan

Putting a backer plate in an inaccessible area

Here is how I fixed an unwanted hole in the transom of a foam-filled boat.

  1. I drilled a ½” diameter hole on each side of the unwanted hole,then used a saber saw to connect the holes to form a slot.
  2. Next, I cut 4mm thick plywood into a football-shaped backer plat that would fit through the slot the narrow way. I attached strings to the plate, coated it with epoxy then slipped it through the slot.
  3. Using the strings, I turned the plate so that it covered the three holes and the slot. Reference marks on the plate helped me get it in the right position.

Continue reading

removing fiberglass

Fiberglass Removal Techniques

By Tom Pawlak

Occasionally we receive calls from people who want to remove fiberglass cloth from wooden structures. The fiberglass on the bottom of a stripper canoe has worn out or the fiberglass and polyester on the deck of an older wooden sailboat has delaminated. The techniques described here work well for removing 1 or 2 layers of fiberglass cloth from wood surfaces. Continue reading