Tag Archives: Fall 1995

Boat Recycling

An Historic Tradition

By Meade Gougeon

It was 100 years ago this spring that Joshua Slocum departed Boston Harbor on the first single-handed voyage around the world. What made this feat even more amazing was Slocum’s boat: the 37’ oyster dragger was rumored to have been over 100 years old when it was given to him in 1892. She lay rotting in a field when Slocum began a restoration that took two years of hard work. He also modified her original design, making her more seaworthy and easy to sail single-handedly. He named the boat SPRAY. Continue reading

A Teak Wheel in a Weekend

By Ray Locke

This is a project which will give your stainless steel helm’s wheel a beautiful wooden look, a softer and sturdier feel. Mine looks great and, with a new teak cockpit table, really improves the look of the helm station. It is done by wrapping the wheel with pieces of teak that have been hollowed out and rounded over, then epoxied together. The end product feels heavier than the stainless steel wheel, is about ½“ greater in diameter, and is beautiful. Continue reading

New Beach Cat (Part II)

Final Details

By Captain James R. Watson

(In Epoxyworks #5 I wrote New Beach Cat (Part I)—The Hull Story about constructing the hulls of my new beach cat.)

There is a little aftershock related to this event, with all the anticipation and abstracting of what she’ll finally be like—now we find out. One finds it is also time to evaluate whether or not this project fulfills the criteria that drove its initiation. Continue reading

An Air Cushioned Launcher

By Captain James R. Watson

I thought Jan Gougeon’s idea of an air-cushioned boat launcher was crazy at first. Then I thought if I could build a platform narrow enough to fit between the hulls of my catamaran, low enough to fit under the beams and powerful enough to lift the entire catamaran, it would be feasible to levitate the boat over yard, beach, sand bars, virtually anywhere. Continue reading

budget

Staying Within Your Budget

By Captain James R. Watson

Staying within a set budget of time and money can be the toughest of all goals for a boat builder. The beach cat I wrote about in this issue is the 19th boat I’ve built from scratch. From these projects, and from talking to many folks building similar projects, I’ve learned some elements of maintaining a budget of time and money. Continue reading

Getting the Most out of Mini Pumps

By Jim Derck

When using WEST SYSTEM® 300 Mini Pumps, the most important things to remember are:

  1. Read the instructions.
  2. Use one full pumps stroke of resin for each one full pump stroke of hardener to get the proper resin-to-hardener ratio.

If you’re ever concerned that your pumps aren’t metering properly, simply mix a test batch of 3 pump strokes each of resin and hardener. Stir thoroughly and make sure it’s fully cured before continuing with your project. Continue reading

Plaque on the Figurehead of the HMS UNITE'

A Brief History of the H.M.S. Unite’

The title signed on the figurehead repaired with WEST SYSTEM® products and featured in Restoration of a Figurehead in Epoxyworks #6, gives the following history of her host ship:

H.M.S. UNITE’
Fifth rate frigate ~ 38 guns
Captured from the French in 1794
Previously named Imperieuse. Renamed Unite’ in 1803
Was in three Successful Actions against the
French, on 1st May, 4th July and 29th Nov 1811
Converted for use as a Convict Hospital Ship in 1836
Broken up at Chatham in 1858.

Continue reading

Restoring MELANIE’s Deck

Courtesy of Peter Townrow

Melanie was built in 1919 by the German shipyard Abeking & Rasmussen, and previously bore the names WOLF and SANPAN. The 42’ sailboat was purchased in 1956 by Sir Eric Seal, Winston Churchill’s former secretary. After Seal and a group of civil servants restored her, MELANIE became the first yacht of the Civil Service Sailing Association. Continue reading

Light-Duty Mold Construction

By Brian Knight

Mold building is a straightforward concept. Way, way back when I was in kindergarten, I made an imprint of my hand in clay for a Mother’s Day gift. I was given a ball of soft clay into which I pressed my hand. When the clay hardened, a permanent reverse shape of my hand, or mold, was created. If I ever needed to, I could coat the mold with a thin coat of wax, pour in some plaster and reproduce exactly what my hand looked like when I was 5 years old. I could do this hundreds of times if I so desired. Continue reading