Tag Archives: Epoxyworks #23

Fabricating an Air Scoop

Using the Lost Foam Method

By Brian Knight

I used lost foam construction to fabricate a fiberglass air scoop for my son’s Formula Continental C race car. Our project started because a modification to the shape of the race car body necessitated the construction of a new air scoop. The air scoop is bolted to the car body so if either the air scoop or the body is damaged (a very likely scenario), the repair will be simpler. To fabricate the scoop, I made a Styrofoam male mold, surrounded the mold with fiberglass, and then dissolved the Styrofoam to leave a hollow part. I used Styrofoam to build the male mold for several reasons. It is readily available at most lumberyards, it is easy to shape with files and sandpaper, and it is easy to dissolve with lacquer thinner.

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Scheherazade Update

Courtesy of Hodgdon Yachts

Epoxyworks #23, Spring 2006

Cover Photo: Scheherazade, a 155′ Ted Fontaine-designed ketch. Image by Onne van der Wal.

Hodgdon Yachts of East Boothbay, Maine launched of the 155′ ketch, Scheherazade. She is a beautiful union of wood/epoxy technology, elegant design and superior craftsmanship.

You may recall from Epoxyworks 17 and 19 that Scheherazade was to be one of the largest cold molded wood/epoxy vessels ever built in the United States. Her 3½” thick hull is made of inner and outer layers of 7/8″ Douglas fir planking running fore and aft and separated by
four diagonal layers of 7/16″ western red cedar bonded with WEST SYSTEM® epoxy. Continue reading

The Limitations of Statues

By Bill Bertelsen

Creating lasting outdoor art has challenged humans since the dawn of time. One has only to think of the pyramids (still there), Stonehenge (mostly there), the Colossus of Rhodes (long gone), or the Easter Island monoliths (surviving, but then two heads are better than one). In more recent times, there’s Mt. Rushmore, Stone Mountain Georgia, and the Statue of Liberty. The goal is nothing less than perpetuity. But of course, outdoor sculpture needs to be done right or it won’t last. Making statues, e.g., permanent structures that look like people, is particularly difficult. Continue reading

Building a Masthead Fitting

by Captain James R. Watson

Here’s another use of the lost foam method to produce a custom part with a molded interior cavity. In this case, the part was a mast head fitting to hold an internal sheave and provide a route for the halyard to pass. This method can be adapted to a variety of other applications, as demonstrated in Fabricating an Airscoop. Continue reading

Heat deflection test apparatus

If You Can’t Take the Heat…

By Bruce Niederer

Among both professionals and amateurs in the world of composites, there are certain enduring misconceptions and rumors regarding the effects of elevated temperature on an epoxy bond. Armed with just enough misinformation to be dangerous, folks will make important decisions that can lead to costly or time-consuming mistakes that might have been avoided if they had an adequate understanding of the principles that encompass epoxy structures and temperature. By defining some commonly used terms and briefly discussing issues surrounding application, we hope to dispel some of these misconceptions. Continue reading

Rebuilding an International 110

By Tim Botimer

I first got into International 110 sailing 15 years ago and soon bought an old fixer-upper boat. After sailing it for a couple of years in a decrepit state, I made the decision to fix it right. I had worked with WEST SYSTEM® products before, and I was pretty familiar with the product line. I had done significant repairs on a 1965 Continue reading

Comparing Cost and Weight of Flat Panels

By Jeff Wright

We compared the cost and weight of four panel types:

• Epoxy coated XL Plywood Boat Panel

• Epoxy coated Okoume Marine Plywood

• Epoxy/fiberglass/balsa cored composite

• Epoxy/fiberglass/core cell foam composite       

Many WEST SYSTEM® customers appreciate the benefits of cored composite construction. They understand that it creates a part that is lightweight, strong, and stiff. We often receive calls from these customers inquiring about using a composite panel when building or repairing something that would normally be made of plywood. Such projects may include a Continue reading

Practical uses for razor blades

Practical Uses for Razor Blades

By Tom Pawlak

Necessity is the mother of invention, and razor blades are often called into service for a variety of tasks around the shop other than shaving. Here are a few.

MINI-SPREADER

Razor blades can be used in a pinch to apply caulks and thickened epoxies with great precision. They do a great job filling isolated pinholes and scratches, especially when the blade is laid at a low angle (nearly flat) when spreading the putty. Continue reading

Giving BOUNTY HUNTER New Skin

By Patrick Ropp

Five years ago, Captain Glenn James decided it was time to make improvements to his Coast Guard-inspected charter fishing boat operating out of Edgewater and Solomon’s Island on the Chesapeake Bay. Bounty Hunter is a 65′ cedar-strip planked hull, a one-off Davis™ hull built in 1967 at Harkers Island, North Carolina. The planks are fastened to frames on 16″ centers with monel fasteners. The cedar strips are narrow, less than 2″ wide, and are edge nailed with monel nails and edge glued. Continue reading

Building a Planter Box

By Brian Knight

My wife gave me the basic guidelines for a planter box she wanted me to build. First, keep it cheap. Second, she wanted an “L” shape. Third, she provided some rough dimensions. The design was up to me. Logic seems to abandon me when I design something, and this project was no exception. A nice, straightforward box with square corners should have been the default. But after some doodling on paper, I decided to build a planter with flared sides and rounded corners. Continue reading