Tag Archives: Catamaran

Stray Cat Strut

By Andy Davidson

I have just about finished restoring a Gougeon Tornado. I’ve always had and loved catamarans, and this one had been sitting out in the sun at the Oklahoma City Boat Club for years. Bob, a fellow club member, offered some parts. His plans were to “chainsaw the hulls tomorrow” and put the pieces in the club Dumpster. That was the push I needed. In a moment of insanity, I told him there was no way I could let him do that. Continue reading

James Wharram Designs

By J.R. Watson For many decades Gougeon Brothers Inc. has kept in contact with multihull designer James Wharram. Wharram, of Cornwall, UK, has sailed and designed Polynesian-style catamarans for 50 years. Amateurs and professionals have built his boats and sailed them to all corners of the planet. The designs he creates with his engineer and artist partner Hanneke Boon have evolved over the years, but remain unmistakably, Wharram Catamarans. Continue reading

Birth of the Gougmarans

by Meade Gougeon

Epoxyworks 25

Cover Photo: Brothers Meade & Jan Gougeon aboard their power catamarans with Dick Newick-designed hulls — GOUGMARAN and MAGIC CARPET.

In 2003, my brother Jan and I began talking about building a motorboat. This would be a first for the brothers, who up to this point have focused all our efforts on sailboats. Just a few years ago, it would have been inconceivable that we would ever take up power boating. But time and circumstances change one’s views, especially as we enter our senior years. We have always regretted that major parts of our home waters, the Saginaw Bay of Lake Huron, Michigan, have been too shallow for our sailboats. Some of the most attractive parts of the Bay with the best wildlife have been off limits to boats that draw more than 18 inches. Continue reading

Developing Multihulls

By Michael Leneman, Multi Marine

What is the simplest way for a home builder to build a good, light hull for a catamaran or trimaran? A few years ago, we set about looking for an inexpensive way to construct a small trimaran that we had developed as a prototype. The answer we came up with was unique: to combine a fiberglass molded “pan” with plywood/glass/epoxy topsides. Continue reading

Repairing a Hobie 16

By Brian Knight

My son was sailing his older model Hobie 16 when the aft trampoline post suddenly gave way. The support structure holding the post in place failed, allowing the deck to deflect downwards and also punching a hole in the hull. Paul used WEST SYSTEM Epoxy and the following techniques to repair the damage. Continue reading

fairing a beach cat's bottom

Fairing a Fiberglass Beach Cat’s Bottom

By Captain James R. Watson

Dragging your catamaran over sandy beaches can abrade away material on the bottom of the hull, thereby flattening the sectional shape. Usually this area will extend 4 or 5 feet each way of the hull’s mid-section. You need to fix it so it doesn’t wear through, and to maintain optimum design performance. Continue reading

New Beach Cat (Part II)

Final Details

By Captain James R. Watson

(In Epoxyworks #5 I wrote New Beach Cat (Part I)—The Hull Story about constructing the hulls of my new beach cat.)

There is a little aftershock related to this event, with all the anticipation and abstracting of what she’ll finally be like—now we find out. One finds it is also time to evaluate whether or not this project fulfills the criteria that drove its initiation. Continue reading

An Air Cushioned Launcher

By Captain James R. Watson

I thought Jan Gougeon’s idea of an air-cushioned boat launcher was crazy at first. Then I thought if I could build a platform narrow enough to fit between the hulls of my catamaran, low enough to fit under the beams and powerful enough to lift the entire catamaran, it would be feasible to levitate the boat over yard, beach, sand bars, virtually anywhere. Continue reading

New Beach Cat (Part I)

The Hull Story

By Captain James R. Watson

In issue Epoxyworks issue #4 I wrote about the construction of new hulls for my Hobie-14 catamaran and discussed details that made building it easier. Well, as with most building projects, it was not completed on time. I can blame only this summer’s excellent sailing conditions for the delay. Whenever I had time to work on the boat, I went sailing instead. Of course, my reliable Hobie-14 sitting on the beach was the source of my summer-long delay. Heck, I support the concept of “take your time and enjoy the building project rather than rush through it.” Continue reading