Tag Archives: Balsa

Gougeon 12.3 canoes

The Gougeon 12.3 Canoe

by Tom Pawlak

Epoxyworks 29

Cover Photo: A small sampling of the Gougeon 12.3 canoe family. Robert Monroe’s cold-molded canoe (foreground) came from a half-mold that eventually resulted in the a 12.3 mold (object directly behind first canoe) which has been used since 1989 to produce dozens of offspring that reflect a wide raged of tastes and technology.

The Gougeon 12.3 canoe represents several decades of experimentation by employees of Gougeon Brothers. Dozens have been built but no two are exactly alike. The evolution of the Gougeon 12.3 parallels our love of boating, passion for innovation and desire to build better boats—all of which contribute to the products we produce today.

It started 35 years ago with a personal project of Jim Gardiner, who was an employee of Gougeon Brothers at the time. He wanted to build the lightest solo canoe possible  Continue reading

Comparing Cost and Weight of Flat Panels

By Jeff Wright

We compared the cost and weight of four panel types:

• Epoxy coated XL Plywood Boat Panel

• Epoxy coated Okoume Marine Plywood

• Epoxy/fiberglass/balsa cored composite

• Epoxy/fiberglass/core cell foam composite       

Many WEST SYSTEM® customers appreciate the benefits of cored composite construction. They understand that it creates a part that is lightweight, strong, and stiff. We often receive calls from these customers inquiring about using a composite panel when building or repairing something that would normally be made of plywood. Such projects may include a Continue reading

Replacing Damaged Balsa Core

By Bruce Niederer

I love my boat. I love to spend time with it-sailing it, working on it, improving it.

I think I need my head examined.

Seriously, there’s got to be something wrong with me! I actually expected that applying a new non-skid deck to TRIPLE THREAT, our 1981 Pearson Flyer, would be a fairly straightforward project. I always think like that before I get started. One would think I might know better by now, but that type of learning apparently requires some protein sequence that’s missing from my DNA. Continue reading

mounting a cleat

Repair Tips: Backer Plates & Mounting Cleats

By Jerry Cronan

Putting a backer plate in an inaccessible area

Here is how I fixed an unwanted hole in the transom of a foam-filled boat.

  1. I drilled a ½” diameter hole on each side of the unwanted hole,then used a saber saw to connect the holes to form a slot.
  2. Next, I cut 4mm thick plywood into a football-shaped backer plat that would fit through the slot the narrow way. I attached strings to the plate, coated it with epoxy then slipped it through the slot.
  3. Using the strings, I turned the plate so that it covered the three holes and the slot. Reference marks on the plate helped me get it in the right position.

Continue reading