Category Archives: Weird & Wonderful

bronze, glass & epoxy sunflowers

Bronze, Glass, and Epoxy Sunflowers

By George Gish

My sunflower project began after I’d brought home from the farmer’s market three sunflowers planted in a small barrel. I placed the flowers on the patio outside my kitchen’s sliding glass door. Every time I sat at the kitchen table, I looked out at this bright splash of color and felt pleasantly relaxed. That happy, soothing view ended two days later when deer ate the sunflowers. I wanted my view back, but knew that buying more flowers would just provide another meal for the deer. I decided to re-create the flowers in something they couldn’t eat: glass and bronze. Continue reading

Modern Vardo

Building the Modern Vardo

By Greg Ryan

This vardo was an exciting project and design collaboration with my friend Jill. Recently retired, she and her husband were looking for adventure and a home away from home.

Jill and I studied vardos (Romani wagons), modern RV’s, train cars and tiny homes, borrowing elements from each. This vardo is only 8′ x 12′ yet has a queen size bed, bathroom, refrigerator, hot and cold running water, holding tanks, a furnace, AC/DC electricity, a fold-down porch, and plenty of storage. It is solar-powered and completely self-contained. The wagon is insulated as well. Continue reading

Stayin’ Awake at Daryl’s House

By Bruce Niederer

To stay awake at Daryl’s house requires a lot of caffeine—it must if the Box  o’ Coffee idea he came up with is any indication. Epoxyworks readers may recall his riveting article in issue 40 Dirt Bike Loading Ramp. Daryl is talented, imaginative and loves to build stuff with carbon fiber.

Inspiration hit him one day after buying a Box o’ Coffee from Tim Horton’s® on his way to teach a motorcycle safety class to aspiring scootertrash. Disappointed that the Tim Horton’s coffee didn’t stay warm very long, he salvaged the Mylar® bag with its built-in cap and built his own insulated box. Continue reading

Self Defense Canes

By Mark Copeland

After working for many years as a master plumber, followed by many more at Automotive Concept Studios where I fashioned conceptual car models from clay, I ended up with arthritis and two hip replacements. All the heavy work had caught up with me, leaving me disabled and dependent on a cane. I decided to leave Michigan during the winter months and move to Zephyrhills, Florida. I settled in and started looking for an activity to do, maybe metal detecting, fishing or golf.

Downtown, I happened by a martial arts school and stopped in to watch a class. Afterwards, the owner (Master Gary Hernández) and one of the instructors (Ms. Karuna) introduced themselves to me. Both have 4th degree black belts. I explained my health issues: limited mobility and the need to use a cane. They outlined a class Master Hernández teaches in Cane-Fu®, which is specifically beneficial to someone in my situation. Continue reading

You Can Build It With Fiberglass

By Clayton Woods

Using WEST SYSTEM Epoxy Resin and fiberglass products, I have created numerous helmets, props, and pieces of armor for costuming and cosplay. Cosplay means to dress up as a character from a book, movie, or video game. Employing unorthodox and oft times experimental methods, I have kept costs low and my creativity heightened.

Just about anything you dream up can be built with fiberglass. The only real challenge is to get a close initial shape. After that, you can add or remove material with relative ease. As it is impossible to hang fiberglass in the air, you just need something to put those initial layers on. Continue reading

Readers’ Project, Issue 44

ROCKET Ice Yacht restored with WEST SYSTEM Epoxy

We came across the historic ROCKET ice yacht at the WoodenBoat Show in Mystic, Conn. The ROCKET is 50′ long has a 900 sq. ft. sail and was built in 1888. After many decades of deteriorating in storage and some stop and start restoration attempts, the surviving parts (cockpit, plank, and rudder) were sold to a foundation that formed to restore the historic vessel. In 2003, the Rocket Ice Yacht Foundation of New Jersey purchased what remained of ROCKET for one dollar from the North Shrewsbury Ice Boat and Yacht Club. The project was led by boat builder Bob Pulsh, a retired plumber from Port Monmouth N.J. Bob and his team of volunteers used WEST SYSTEM Epoxy to restore and reconstruct the ice yacht’s parts. The project was completed in 2014.

Continue reading

Strings’ Float

By Greg Bull

When Jan Gougeon built Strings in 2010 one of the most interesting features he included, at least from my point of view, was the float that goes on top of the mast. Due to its zeppelin-like shape, this is also called a blimp or a dirigible. The purpose of the float is to make the boat self-rescuing: if the boat tips, the float prevents it from going any farther than lying on its side. The mast and float are then used to right the boat. Jan developed this system when designing the Gougeon-32 back in the late ’80s, so he thought it would work for Strings. Continue reading

lemniscate hull

The Lemniscate Hull

A Chineless Gull Wing

By Bill Beran

I built this 16′ runabout in my garage over the course of a few years. It was the culmination of an idea I long had for a design that would provide a soft ride with its deep-vee hull, but at the same time exhibit excellent fuel economy. It’s best described as a chineless gull wing. The hull shape captures and efficiently redirects otherwise wasted bow wave energy downward to create lift. It also safely captures ram air under the “wings” (noticeable starting about 40 mph) and attains a comfortable top speed close to 50 mph with the 115hp outboard motor. Continue reading

Dirt Bike Loading Ramp

By Daryl Brunette

A dirt bike loading ramp is very bulky and heavy, but important for loading everything you need in motocross. You can just use a wooden board thick enough to support the weight of your bike, or you can buy expensive aluminum ramps. But I (Daryl) wanted to build one and give it a personal touch, making it lighter and stronger. Continue reading