Category Archives: Home repair, restoration & improvement

Making Custom Wastebaskets

By Tom Pawlak

I don’t know about you, but I have problems finding wastebaskets that fit the spaces I have in mind. The baskets are either way too small or a bit too large for the opening. It happened at a previous house we lived in and it happened again in our current home. My solution was to make my own baskets with 4 to 6mm (3 16″ to 1 4″ thick) plywood sealed with and glued together with WEST SYSTEM® Epoxy. Continue reading

Saving the Deck

Jeff Blackmon

There are often interesting articles in Epoxyworks magazine illustrating the different uses of the WEST SYSTEM epoxy. I admire the time and effort that goes into some of these handmade boats that are like art projects. But in my particular situation, I was most concerned about strength rather than the aesthetics. I was dealing with wood rot at the bases of the support posts for a large patio deck. There are two levels on this deck, with the patio furniture on the top level and a built-in hot tub in the lower level. The deck is constructed of 6×6 support posts, 2×12 flooring supports and 2×4s for the finished floor. All of this is redwood. Continue reading

Revisiting a Church Window Restoration

By J.R. Watson

Those working on projects that use epoxy for restoration and rot repair often ask, “How long will this last? Will the rot return?” At Gougeon Brothers, Inc., we have lots of in-house test approaches that can analyze tension, compression, shear, and fatigue. We can also predict the consequences of ultra-violet, arid, tropical, and cold conditions. Still, there’s nothing like real-world performance over time. Continue reading

Metal Door Repair

WEST SYSTEM 410 Microlight® to the Rescue!

By Jim Derck

At the end of moving day, after many large items had passed through the doorway, our house’s steel door was left with a nasty crease about a foot long. The door had a foam core. The needed repair was just a fairing application with no structural component. Continue reading

Building a Planter Box

By Brian Knight

My wife gave me the basic guidelines for a planter box she wanted me to build. First, keep it cheap. Second, she wanted an “L” shape. Third, she provided some rough dimensions. The design was up to me. Logic seems to abandon me when I design something, and this project was no exception. A nice, straightforward box with square corners should have been the default. But after some doodling on paper, I decided to build a planter with flared sides and rounded corners. Continue reading

Table Top Applications

By Captain James R. Watson

Pouring a thick coating of epoxy onto a table top can produce a unique effect. With a ¼” thick coating, you can cast a variety of objects in the epoxy for decorative accents. Coins, fabrics, sticks of wood, memorabilia and photographs have been used in this decoupage application. Here are a few tricks to make things go more smoothly. Continue reading

Fence Construction Revisted

By Brian Knight

Every now and then it is good to look back at a project to see how it has held up over several years. Above is a photo of the western red cedar fence I built in the summer of 1998 (as it looks today) and below, the fence as it looked during and just after construction five years ago. This fence uses no nails, screws, bolts, etc. to hold it together. Only WEST SYSTEM® epoxy holds the spindles to the rails and the rails to the posts. Continue reading

Installing a Basketball Goal

By Brian Knight

Bob Warters: I am installing a basketball goal in my driveway. My pole has a 10″ diameter flange on the bottom (9″ bolt hole diameter) with six holes for ½” anchors. I intend to use ½” stainless allthread (threaded rod) for the anchor bolts. If I drill 9/16″ holes in the concrete 3½” deep and use your system to fix the threaded rod to the concrete, how much tension would you estimate the rods would hold? The concrete is about a year old, it’s 4″ thick and has ½” rebar on one foot centers.  Continue reading

Wood/Epoxy Sump Cover

Richard Jobe was faced with having a sump located in the middle of a prominent landscaped area in front of his Newburgh, Indiana home. His solution was to build a cover (middle) for the sump that would be light enough for one person to handle, strong enough to hold the weight of half a foot of pea stone, and water resistant enough to survive being buried underground. Continue reading