Category Archives: Fixing Broken Stuff!

Repairing a Hockey Stick

By Captain James R. Watson

Ice hockey sticks are exposed to cold temperatures plus high shock forces from contact with the puck as well as with the ice and skates. Hockey sticks can be wood/fiberglass laminates or composites of carbon fiber or aramid. The stick blades often chip and split with use and have to be repaired (or else replaced at $50–$150 each). A customer who repairs and maintains hockey sticks for a local team had been using a conventional epoxy for repairs and found that it often chipped under such use. Continue reading

Fortifying a Spare-Parts Scootboard

By Bill Bertelsen

“Daddy, can we build a scooter from these old pieces of wood?”

Thus began a father-daughter project with my 8-year-old that provided a learning opportunity for both of us. That weekend Mikayla had been scrounging in our spare lumber barrel and found two items that immediately suggested themselves as “scooter parts.” After examining her selections, I had to agree. One piece was a 32″-long strip of A/C grade Southern yellow pine plywood, about 5 8″ thick and 3½” wide. It was the perfect size for the “chassis.” The other piece was a stick of solid oak, ¾”×1¼”×33½”, ideal for anchoring a handle bar. Continue reading

Pot repair with epoxy

One-Shot Pot Repair

By Tom Pawlak

My wife Mary and I recently went to the local building center to purchase a large planter pot for our patio. After we had agreed on a nice large terra-cotta beauty, I noticed another large pot that had a serious crack. I asked the associate for a price on it, knowing it would be easy to repair with WEST SYSTEM® epoxy. He said I would be doing him a favor if I took it away. So we came home with two pots for the price of one. Continue reading

Metal Door Repair

WEST SYSTEM 410 Microlight® to the Rescue!

By Jim Derck

At the end of moving day, after many large items had passed through the doorway, our house’s steel door was left with a nasty crease about a foot long. The door had a foam core. The needed repair was just a fairing application with no structural component. Continue reading

The Limitations of Statues

By Bill Bertelsen

Creating lasting outdoor art has challenged humans since the dawn of time. One has only to think of the pyramids (still there), Stonehenge (mostly there), the Colossus of Rhodes (long gone), or the Easter Island monoliths (surviving, but then two heads are better than one). In more recent times, there’s Mt. Rushmore, Stone Mountain Georgia, and the Statue of Liberty. The goal is nothing less than perpetuity. But of course, outdoor sculpture needs to be done right or it won’t last. Making statues, e.g., permanent structures that look like people, is particularly difficult. Continue reading

Furniture Repair with G/5

By Tom Pawlak
I recently broke the leg off an old workshop table. The tabletop was made of particleboard covered with Formica®. The screws holding the leg in place had pulled out and taken chunks of particleboard with them (The problem).

I was desperate to use the table later in the day so G/5 Five-Minute Adhesive seemed perfect for the repair. This is a good method for repairing inexpensive particleboard or fiberboard furniture: Continue reading

Emergency Pump Repair

Barry Bew, a sailing instructor at Arethusa Venture Centre, Gravesend, Kent, UK, used his experience as a plant engineer to make an emergency repair to a swimming pool circulating pump. The pump was leaking at joints between the 3″ ABS plastic inlet and discharge pipes and the cast iron pump body. Continue reading

Repairing an Historic Statue

By Mike Barker

For over fifty years, “Sparty” has been a familiar figure on the campus of Michigan State University in East Lansing, Michigan. The Spartan statue was built in 1945 and, at 11′ tall and 3000 lb, it is believed to be the world’s largest freestanding ceramic sculpture. Sparty has survived many an attack by vandals, but it is no match for Michigan winters. Continue reading