Category Archives: Boat Construction

Mistral gets rolled over

Rolling the 64′ Schooner MISTRAL

Courtesy of Legendary Yachts, Inc.

Washougal, Washington — George H. McEvoy, of Boothbay Harbor, Maine, watched with keen interest as Legendary Yachts, Inc. slowly rotated his Mistral to an upright position. She was designed by L. Francis Herrshoff in 1937 and is being faithfully recreated by our team of craftsmen for a fall 1999 delivery. Mistral measures 63′-6″ x 15′ x 6′-3″ and will carry a baldheaded gaff main and foresail rig of approximately 2,000 sq. ft. Continue reading

TITANIC, the Model

by Richard Barrie

Epoxyworks #12, Fall 1998

Cover Photo: A familiar view of the TITANIC. A member of the film crew on the right gives the model scale.

Many models of the RMS TITANIC were built for the 1997 blockbuster movie. Two of them were built by Western Boatworks of Reseda, California using WEST SYSTEM® products exclusively. Continue reading

The Yazaki Ark

By Grace Ombry

Eric Goetz (Goetz Composites) completed a 165′ structure they call The Ark. This striking wooden craft will never touch the water. Instead it will hang inside the headquarters of the America Yazaki Corporation in Canton, Michigan. The Japanese company is the largest supplier of automotive parts in the world. Continue reading

A Plywood Runabout

Thomas Heavner of Seattle Washington designed and built his own 18′ plywood runabout. Mr. Heavner sent pictures of his project and wrote, “This is the first boat of any kind that I have designed and constructed. Your book (The Gougeon Brothers on Boat Construction) made it possible to build this boat.

Continue reading

Jubilee Sailing Trust (Tenacious) Project

Courtesy of Wessex Resins & Adhesives, Romsey, England

At the Jubilee Yard in Southampton England, progress continues on the Jubilee Sailing Trust ship. The ring frames are all erected, and for a short period, the completed skeleton of the ship resembled a giant toast rack. Continue reading

Strip Construction, an Overview

by Captain James R. Watson

Editor’s note: to learn more about building the strip plank mailbox, paddle or clipboard in the featured image (above), see Start off Simple.

Epoxyworks #10, Winter 1998

Cover Photo: Strip construction is detailed throughout Epoxyworks #10.

We feature strip construction in this edition of Epoxyworks because of the wide range of projects we have seen over the years and the many we support on a daily basis. In most peoples minds, the beautiful, well-built stripper canoe almost defines the technique. But, we’ve also seen strip mailboxes and ships, cars and cradles, airplanes and artwork. The versatility of strip construction is well matched to the versatility of WEST SYSTEM® epoxy. Continue reading

Types of Strip Plank Material

By Brian Knight

Modern strip composite construction uses narrow strips of wood or foam to make a low density core material. These strips are easy for one person to handle and are readily assembled into complex shapes. However, this assembled structure does not have much strength until it is covered inside and out with a high density fiber reinforced skin—usually fiberglass cloth. The process of making and fitting the narrow strips together is more time consuming than bending a sheet of plywood, but the technique allows for more creativity in the design. Continue reading

How Tough are They?

By Captain James R. Watson

Once I went over a small falls in my stripper kayak. At the bottom was broken concrete with rebar in it. I clenched my teeth as the little kayak ground over it—hoping I’d built it tough enough. Fortunately, when I pulled to the bank to inspect the damage, there were only superficial scrapes. Continue reading