Monthly Archives: July 2014

Repairing a Runabout Floor or Pontoon Deck

By Joe Parker

A common source of problems on open runabouts and pontoon boats is the cockpit floor or deck. This part of the boat is usually just a layer of plywood screwed down to the top of stringers and frames. Many have a layer of carpet or vinyl flooring material glued onto the plywood. Continue reading

Stringer Repairs in Fiberglass Boats

by Brian Knight

Epoxyworks 11

Cover Photo: Fiberglass boats can be repaired with WEST SYSTEM Epoxy.

Fixing damaged or delaminated stringers is one of the most common repairs associated with fiberglass boats. The usual causes of stringer failure are disintegration of the stringer core material, impact damage from slamming and grounding, and fatigue from normal use. Although each repair situation has its own unique problems, the following techniques are fundamental to stringer repair. These guidelines will help you repair almost any damaged stringer. Remember, stringers are structural support members. As you repair or replace damaged material, use your best workmanship. Continue reading

Jubilee Sailing Trust (Tenacious) Project

Courtesy of Wessex Resins & Adhesives, Romsey, England

At the Jubilee Yard in Southampton England, progress continues on the Jubilee Sailing Trust ship. The ring frames are all erected, and for a short period, the completed skeleton of the ship resembled a giant toast rack. Continue reading

Techniques for Fiberglassing Overhead

By Tom Pawlak

The prospect of having to fiberglass the bottom of a hull can be a bit ominous. Any type of overhead work can be frustrating, but the thought of trying to hold fiberglass in place while applying epoxy can produce nightmares for some people. This is especially true if you will be working alone. Continue reading

Repairing Fiberglass Powerboat Transoms

By Tom Pawlak

Transoms are major structural parts of fiberglass powerboats, especially outboards. Transoms not only support the weight of the motor, they maintain the shape of the boat, they are a mounting point for holdowns, towing eyes and other accessories. And, they must be able to let water out of the hull, without letting it back in. Continue reading

Table Top Applications

By Captain James R. Watson

Pouring a thick coating of epoxy onto a table top can produce a unique effect. With a ¼” thick coating you can cast a variety of objects in the epoxy for decorative accents. Coins, fabrics, sticks of wood, memorabilia and photographs have been used in this decoupage application. Here are a few tricks to make things go more smoothly. Continue reading

Strip Construction, an Overview

by Captain James R. Watson

Editor’s note: to learn more about building the strip plank mailbox, paddle or clipboard in the featured image (above), see Start off Simple.

Epoxyworks #10, Winter 1998

Cover Photo: Strip construction is detailed throughout Epoxyworks #10.

We feature strip construction in this edition of Epoxyworks because of the wide range of projects we have seen over the years and the many we support on a daily basis. In most peoples minds, the beautiful, well-built stripper canoe almost defines the technique. But, we’ve also seen strip mailboxes and ships, cars and cradles, airplanes and artwork. The versatility of strip construction is well matched to the versatility of WEST SYSTEM® epoxy. Continue reading

Types of Strip Plank Material

By Brian Knight

Modern strip composite construction uses narrow strips of wood or foam to make a low density core material. These strips are easy for one person to handle and are readily assembled into complex shapes. However, this assembled structure does not have much strength until it is covered inside and out with a high density fiber reinforced skin—usually fiberglass cloth. The process of making and fitting the narrow strips together is more time consuming than bending a sheet of plywood, but the technique allows for more creativity in the design. Continue reading