Monthly Archives: June 2014

Big Batch Mixing Methods

By Tom Pawlak

Most of us use epoxy in small batches, mixing several ounces at once. This gets the job done 95% of the time. But for some projects, such as large laminating jobs, you may need large batches of epoxy. Before you begin, you should understand what’s involved in mixing big batches of epoxy. Continue reading

RAGE, a west coast success

RAGE, a West Coast Success

By Meade Gougeon

The 70′ sailboat RAGE holds the record for the fastest elapsed time for a monohull from the west coast to Hawaii. In 1994, she set the record of eight days, seven hours and thirteen minutes in the West Marine Pacific Cup from San Francisco to Kanoehe, Hawaii. RAGE took another seven hours off that record this past year. Continue reading

Fiber-Reinforced Composites

By Captain James R. Watson

Futurist Daniel Burrus lists Fiber-Reinforced Composites (more commonly known as Fiber-Reinforced Plastic or FRP) as one of the top twenty core technologies that will shape the future. In company with FRC are genetic engineering, superconductors, thin-film deposition and so on. Among the top twenty core technologies, FRC is the only one you can use in your own little shop, for really important things like your boat or similar hobbies. Continue reading

Simple Shop Tools to Make

By the Gougeon Technical Staff

Making a hole-locating tool

When replacing planking, often you have to drill a new hole through the wood and “hit” the existing hole on the frame (so as not to riddle the frame with new holes). This tool will help you properly locate the new hole. You can either modify a set of barbecue tongs to make this tool, or fashion one from strips of aluminum. Drill a hole in the blades. Attach a pointed stud to the lower blade. Continue reading

Fiberglassing – Shop Tips

By Tom Pawlak

Corners that require fiberglassing need to be rounded to allow the fiberglass cloth to conform to the corner. If the fabric you are working with won’t conform to a rounded corner, here’s a tip that may help. When draping fiberglass around a corner, orient it so the fibers are at a 45° angle to the corner. The fibers will conform much better than if oriented at 90°, because they are not bending nearly as much. Continue reading

Maine Boat Builders Show

Maine has always been a great place for boat lovers and boat builders. The two converge every year at the Maine Boat Builders Show in Portland. Despite Maine’s late winter snows, large crowds attend the show. Here are some of the boats exhibited at one show—coincidentally, their builders used WEST SYSTEM® Epoxy. Continue reading

A Few Good Books

By Captain James R. Watson

canoecraft

Canoecraft by Ted Moores and Marylyn Mohr

Canoecraft—By Ted Moores & Marilyn Mohr

Step-by-step instructions for building a strip composite canoe. Features detailed drawings and photographs. Includes offsets for 7 designs. Revised and expanded. 32 pages.

 

 

Continue reading

Wood & Epoxy Car


Courtesy of Wessex Resins & Adhesives, Romsey, England

Peter Warner has always been interested in old cars. Late in 1990, he saw an old Citroen 2CV in a car scrap yard. After some negotiation, he paid about <£60 to have the “donor” vehicle delivered to his home. He wanted only the chassis, tires, wheels and the steering column. The old body was collected and taken back to the scrap yard one week later as part of the £60 deal. Continue reading

The Re-commissioning of Adagio

by Meade A. Gougeon

Epoxyworks 8

Cover Photo: ADAGIO was racing with fast company in the 1996 Port Huron to Mackinac Race.

It was after eight months of building that we originally launched Adagio, our 35-foot cruising trimaran. It was on July 6, 1970, and she was then a unique boat in three respects.

First, she was the first large wooden boat entirely bonded together with epoxy using no permanent fastenings. While this is common today, it was revolutionary stuff back when adhesives for wooden boatbuilding (including epoxies) were looked upon as a backup to traditional wood fasteners like nails, screws and bolts. Continue reading