Monthly Archives: March 2014

How to Get Epoxy Off Your Clothes

by Captain James R. Watson

It has probably happened to us all once or twice. You’re all dressed up and just before going out the door you swing through your shop to check on the project. Sure enough, a dab of epoxy finds its way onto your best pants. Believe me, it has happened to me plenty of times. My poor mother grieved with all the school clothes I carelessly ruined in my sloppy days as a kid boatbuilder. Continue reading

How to Loft Airfoil Sections

by Captain James R. Watson

When a designer chooses a foil section for a particular design, that section is often not produced to a close tolerance. I sailed on a boat that was noted for its erratic steering: the problem boiled down to an asymmetrical rudder. Optimization of the airfoil section translates into measurable performance and handling benefits. Continue reading

Durable Edges for Centerboards & Flip Up Rudders

by Jim Derck

When centerboards and flip up rudders drag across the bottom, the first fiberglass to abrade away is usually the leading edge at the bottom. This exposes the end grain of the wood, allowing water to be absorbed the length of the centerboard or rudder. The wood then expands, cracking the fiberglass along the leading edge and causing more problems. When it is time to repair the tip, it usually takes a long time to dry the wood for an effective repair. Continue reading

Building a Mini Hydroplane

by Brian Knight

Race boat builder Jon Staudacher suggested this design for my 12-year-old son Paul several years ago. It is an 8′-long hydroplane, powered by a 5 to 15 HP outboard motor and can accommodate a driver up to 150 pounds. Paul and his friend built the boat in three or four days. Continue reading

Proper Disposal of Leftover Resin & Hardener

by Glenn House &  Tim Atkinson

The technical staff of Gougeon Brothers, Inc. has recently received inquiries about proper disposal of left over resin and hardener. The increase in customer concern results from more stringent environmental regulations and heightened awareness of the need to protect the environment. We are happy to receive these inquiries because it lets us know that epoxy users are taking responsibility for proper disposal of these products. We hope this article gives you a better understanding of basic proper disposal procedures. Continue reading

Why People Build Boats

By Ron Frenette

Canoes take a rest

A rest break after crossing a big open stretch into a facing wind—day 2 of a 7-day trip. Closest is a 16’ Prospector, in the middle is Ron Frenette and his wife in their 17’ Nomad and on the outside is a traditional wood canvas canoe built in the 1950’s.

Continue reading

Homemade Hand Soap

This is a formula for homemade resin-removing hand soap that we have used around our shops for the last few years. You can make it in the kitchen blender from common household supplies. The beauty of this stuff is that it’s easy on you, easy to make and easy to clean up. This is a recipe sure to please the whole family. Percentages are provided so you can easily customize batch sizes for a small job or a big work crew. Continue reading

About Ted Moores

Joan Barrett and Ted Moores

Joan Barrett and Ted Moores of Bear Mountain Boats, aboard his 30′ Hybrid Electric Launch SPARKS.

Ted Moores is a renowned boat builder, author and teacher whose name is synonymous with stripper canoes. He and his partner Joan Barrett own Bear Mountain Boats in Peterborough, Ontario.

Ted has written a four-part series of articles on lessons (and “cheap tricks”) learned from building his 30? Electric Hybrid Launch Sparks which incorporates the knowledge he’s gained from 35 years of wood/epoxy boatbuilding.

See Lesson 1 of the SPARKS series—Strip Planking
See Lesson 2 of the SPARKS series—Fiberglassing a Strip-Planked Boat
See Lesson 3 of the SPARKS series—Skeg Construction
See Lesson 4 of the SPARKS series—Sealing and Priming
Related article: Ted’s Jewel Box