Build your own stand-up desk

A Dual Level Computer Stand

Editor’s note: I guess we are nothing if not cutting edge over here at Gougeon Brothers, Inc. Technical Advisor Brian Knight (now retired) wrote this article in 1993 about how to build something that is now a fast-growing trend in the workplace: a stand-up desk. Brian’s “dual level computer stand” will still make a great stand-up option today, although we imagine yours will have a flat screen monitor rather than the cathode ray tubes featured in the image gallery of this article.

by Brian Knight

Because I spend so much time working at a computer, I designed a computer cabinet that would allow me to stand or sit while I work. It takes less than 10 seconds to convert from one position to the other. As an added bonus, moving the computer to its own stand freed some workspace on my desk.

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Home built automobile

Home-Built Automobile

by Grace Ombry

Bill Dauser couldn’t find an automobile to suit his needs, so he designed and built his own using epoxy, among other things.

The Muskegon, Michigan carpenter welded two Eldorado front ends back-to-back to create the frame. This arrangement allowed for front wheel drive and four wheel independent suspension. The auto also has four wheel disc brakes and a Buick 231 V6 engine. Continue reading

polyester rots

Polyester “Rots”

by Robert Monroe

Polyester laminates have been with us since the mid 1940s. They are bright, strong, easily molded to useful shapes, and from all appearances (and advertising) maintenance free. Contrary to our conditioned distrust of wood, we have come to expect these easy features when we think about Fiberglass Reinforced Plastics (FRP). The waxing and occasional polishing required to keep our FRP bright is not very demanding. FRP structures epitomize easy living. Continue reading

releasefabric

Use Release Fabric for Smooth Fillets

by Jim Derck

Our 403 Microfibers and 405 Filleting Blend are excellent structural fillers but they’re fibrous and leave a rough surface when used to make fillets. To end up with a surface that is ready for coating or re-bonding without having to remove amine blush or sand smooth, apply a narrow strip of 879 Release Fabric after the fillet is made. Continue reading

washerscribe

Flat Washer Scribe

by Brian Knight

Most woodworkers, at one time or another, have to scribe a piece of wood to fit closely to an irregular surface. Here is an old boat builder’s method to scribe a line to a gently curved surface. The only equipment necessary is a collection of different size flat washers and a sharp pencil. Continue reading

Your best epoxy choice for bonding to PVC is G/flex.

Bonding PVC Plastic with Epoxy

Editor’s note: This article was originally written in 1994, long before we developed G/flex epoxies which offer vastly superior performance in bonding to plastics including PVC. A much more current article on this subject is Gluing Plastic with G/flex Epoxy by Tom Pawlak and Jeff Wright. If you’re interested in gluing PVC with epoxy, we suggest you start there. The following article is published at Epoxyworks.com for historical purposes only.

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drillguide

A Build-It-Yourself Drill Guide

by Brian Knight

Bud Hauschild, from Hastings, Michigan, sent us this idea for a drill guide used to accurately drill holes through irregularly shaped surfaces. Additionally, you can use this guide to drill from both sides of a thick beam and have the holes line up. Orthopedic surgeons use a similar device to drill holes in bone for screws or pins. Continue reading

The composite hood materials and mold

Composites You Can Build

by Captain James R. Watson

Composites have been on the automobile motor sports racing scene for some time now. Indy cars, Formula 1, IMSA GTP (International Motor Sports Association Grand Touring Prototype), and others employ composites to the fullest limit of the imagination (and budget). Engine builders are even beginning to use composites for internal components. Autoweek, Advanced Composites and similar magazines write about composites constantly. But most of these applications involve sophisticated techniques, tooling and materials such as autoclaves and resin-impregnated materials (pre-pregs). These require aerospace-level technology not commonly available or economical for the amateur builder. Pre-pregs and other advanced composites employ adhesives that require an oven to promote curing (post cure). Continue reading

Ticonderoga under temporary cover at the Shelburne Museum.

Ticonderoga: Testing for the Toughest Deck Coverings

by William D. Bertelsen

Ticonderoga is a 220 ft. sidewheel steamboat built in 1906. She carried passengers on Lake Champlain until 1953. The Shelburne Museum wanted to replace the decks and cover them in a way that recreated the appearance and texture of the original canvas sheathing. But it was equally important that the authentic looking decks be durable enough to survive the unrelenting foot traffic inevitable for such a magnificent museum centerpiece. Continue reading